growing mushrooms from a box

For Christmas this year my sister got me a mushroom grow box for oyster mushrooms.  I have seen these available before but never bought one to try.  The instructions are easy to follow.

  1. Pull tab off of one side of the box
  2. cut an X in the plastic bag and scrape off the white fungus mat to expose the darker growing medium. (looks like saw dust)
  3. soak bag in water for 12 hours
  4. Place plastic bag back into cardboard box.
  5. place in a spot with good light.
  6. Mist daily and you will have mushrooms in 10 days to harvest.

It sounds simple enough to do. Also according to the manufacturer of the kit if you share a picture of your grown mushrooms on their facebook page then they will donate one kit to an elementary of your choice.  Sounds like a great deal to me.

Mushroom kit in the box.
Mushroom kit in the box.
Cardboard square pulled out and ready to have X or a + cut into the plastic.
Cardboard square pulled out and ready to have X or a + cut into the plastic. You can see the fungal mat of white through the plastic.
+ cut into the plastic and the white fungal mat scrapped back to the sawdust.
Cut into the plastic, and scrape the white fungal mat back to the sawdust.
Mushrooms starting to pop out.  This is less then 24hrs from when they first started showing on the sawdust.
Mushrooms starting to pop out. This is less then 24hrs from when they first started showing on the sawdust.
Fast growers.  I wish my veggies would grow like this
Fast growers. I wish my veggies would grow like this.
And the final growth with Katy the mushroom farmer
And the final growth with Katy the mushroom farmer

From start to finish it took 9 days to get them this big.  Not bad for a crop of mushrooms.  Tomorrow will be cooking day with them.  Then I will mist them and see if any more mushrooms grow on this side.  If not I will cut the plastic on the other side and start the process again.  Overall I am impressed with the ease in which these grow.  Katy loved spritzing them with water morning and night.

 

the weird world of Coral mushrooms

Every year when I walk through the woods I see these odd shapes that remind me of a coral reef.  Oregon is home to several different species of coral mushrooms and are well worth a minute to stop and look at them. So far on my journeys I have seen white, yellow, red, and purple corals growing in the coast range.  There are several edible species of coral, but I have never picked or eaten any. Supposedly they are great to eat and some species are sold in markets. But with most mushrooms there are also some poisonous species.  I don’t know anyone that has eaten them so I am most likely not going to try them.  They are very common anywhere in the coast range so if you step off the road into the trees you are likely to find them.  I snapped a couple pictures when I was looking for chanterelles.

yellow coral
A whitish-yellow coral. It was fairly large
A peach colored coral mushroom
A peach colored coral mushroom

Some great reference books:

All That the Rain Promises and More: A Hip Pocket Guide to Western Mushrooms by David Arora (smaller pocket guide that is excellent to use)

National Audubon Society Field Guide to North American Mushrooms (National Audubon Society Field Guides) (all inclusive but fairly large)

There are also several E-books that can be found on Kindle unlimited

 

We are an amazon affiliate so any support helps us make more video and articles. If there are any video subjects or articles you would like to see please comment to let us know

Hedgehog mushrooms (Hydnum repandum)

hydnum_repandumbk-01

This is a great winter mushroom to start finding at this time of year.  It is nearly the same coloration as the yellow Chanterelle just much shorter (there are always exceptions).  Generally you find these mushrooms growing alone with others close by, usually a couple feet away.   Hedgehogs are one of the great mushroom to dehydrate.  After dehydrating they can be used crumbled into soups and stews to give them a unique flavor.  This is one of the mushrooms I like to use when I make my wild mushroom soup. It gives a great creamy texture if you can make the soup with at least a third of the mushrooms being used as hedgehogs.

Hedgehogs are usually found under conifers and occasionally under mixed deciduous trees.  South facing slopes in the coast range will give you the highest chances to find them.  The hedgehog mushroom forms a symbiotic relationship with the trees it grows around. This means that if you find a patch of hedgehog mushrooms you can return year after year for a reliable picking to eat. For this reason, many mushroom hunters will not say where they found this delicious mushrooms, to prevent poaching. It is an excellent choice along with Golden Chanterelles and Yellow foot Chanterelles for an inexperienced mushroom hunter, but the identification should always be verified by someone with more experience and education before eating.

hedgehog-mushroom

Some great reference books:

All That the Rain Promises and More: A Hip Pocket Guide to Western Mushrooms by David Arora (smaller pocket guide that is excellent to use)

National Audubon Society Field Guide to North American Mushrooms (National Audubon Society Field Guides) (all inclusive but fairly large)

There are also several E-books that can be found on Kindle unlimited

We are an amazon affiliate so any support helps us make more video and articles. If there are any video subjects or articles you would like to see please comment to let us know